domestic8

the vagaries of domestic life

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thebrainscoop:

Last night, Anna Goldman and I commandeered a table at Wrigley Field during an event for our Founder’s Council. 

Long story short, I’m pretty sure it was the first time a two-faced calf skull and a 2.5 foot-long walrus baculum ever made an appearance inside of the Cub’s clubhouse. 

Photos by Karen Bean, our staff photographer who runs the Field’s amazing photo archives tumblr

I am perishing of jealously. Wood’s jersey is SO CLOSE!

Filed under chicago cubs baseball wrigley the brain scoop amaze

6,179 notes

Mills College becomes the first single-sex school in the U.S. with policy accepting trans students

gaywrites:

Mills College, a women’s school in Oakland, California, has just made history.

The college has adopted a written policy explicitly stating that trans women are welcome to attend the school, making it the first single-sex school in the country with such a policy.

According to school officials, between 3 and 5 of the school’s 1,000 applicants each year identify as trans or gender nonconforming; this policy will make it easier for these students to apply and attend, should they so choose. The first students for whom the new policy applies will begin their classes this coming spring semester. 

“When people can be authentically who they are — that’s who Mills is,” said Mills senior Tess Fillbeck-Bates.

“This is really just a codification of our practice for several years,” said Brian O’Rourke, vice president for enrollment management.

This is a HUGE deal for students of all gender identities. When colleges and universities are inclusive and affirming on paper as well as in practice, it sets a standard for other schools to follow. Well done, Mills. Well done. 

(via thatgothlibrarian)

Filed under trans* womens college education

494 notes

Anonymous asked: Hello - I was wondering if you knew of any well written fantasy/sci-fi novels that feature more than one LGBTQ+ character and/or has a LGBTQ+ character as the main character? Thanks! :D

catagator:

thegayya:

queermediarepresentation:

Sure! Some of the books I’ll be mentioning below aren’t books I’ve read so I can’t promise they’re well written but they are books I’ve heard nothing but good things about. Also most of the links will be to Amazon.co.uk but you can find all of them on the USA website too, if you have problems finding any let us know and we’ll try to help. Hopefully I’ll have managed to find at least a few things that catch your attention. If I don’t let me know and I’ll try harder haha.

The Wicked Lovely series has Irial and Niall, both of whom are bisexual/pansexual faeries who feature quite heavily in Ink Exchange (this is where their story starts I think), Stopping Time and Old Habits, and I think they’re also in Fragile Eternity and Radiant Shadow but I don’t think they’re main characters, Darkest Mercy is the last book of the series and they’re both in that quite often again too I think. It’s been a while since I read the series but I really enjoyed it.

Adaptation and it’s sequel Inheritence written by Malinda Lo (which isn’t out yet) have been likened to the X-Files, the main character is bisexual and has two love interests in the book, a male and female. It’s about a government conspiracy from what I can tell, bisexual-books​ have a full review on it here.

Also by Malinda Lo is Ash, which I’ve written a short review on here. The main character is attracted to a male character and a female character so she’s polysexual. The novel is basically a retelling of Cinderella but with faeries. 

Adamant by Kieron Wisser is about Greek myths and gods and goddesses being real. There’s at least one lesbian character and possibly more than one bisexual/pansexual character. It’s been a while since I read it so I’m not 100% sure. I wrote a post on it here.

The Second Mango and it’s sequel Climbing the Date Palm by Shira Glassman has dragons, a lesbian princess main character and other various awesome things. There are apparently a few bisexual characters in the second book too, I haven’t read this series but it’s on my list. 

Love in the Time of Global Warming by Francesca Lia Block looks great too, it’s a sci-fi book described as having a main character who is the female Odysseus, if you have a kindle or a free kindle app (for mobile, tablet, computer) you can try the first five chapters for free. It hasn’t been released yet, or at least not in the UK. 

Kings of Ruin has two main gay male characters. From the tiny bit that I’ve read there’s some kind of being which is controlling cars and causing crashes and stuff so I guess that counts as fantasy? idk

Heroine Addiction by Jennifer Matarese is about superheroes. fandomsandfeminism does a full review of it here but from what I can tell the main character is bisexual and it’s a really diverse book in general (good female characters and POC representation). Hero by Perry Moore has a gay male protagonist, it’s another book about superheroes and I really enjoyed reading it. Masks: Rise of Heroes is yet another superhero book with a gay main character, I haven’t read this but it looks pretty good.

We also have reviews on Iron and Velvet (lesbian private detective book with vampires, werewolves and other various supernatural beings) and Static (a genderfluid main character who can literally shift between genders)

The Mortal Instruments has a gay character (Alec) and a bisexual character (Magnus) who are together (or at least they were in the last book I read).

This post on Proxy (with a gay main character) will explain what it’s about. Another post on Prosperity which has sky pirates 

According to riptidepublishingBlacker than Black by Rhi Etzweiler is a non-traditional vampire novel (they eat chi) set in a sort of dystopian future, and that features non binary characters who tend toward androgynous.”

If you’re into graphic novels we have posts on Rat Queens (on of the main characters is queer), Saga (bisexual woman, gay men) and Shutter (trans character).

It’s been a lot harder finding trans/non binary/asexual sci-fi books so if anyone has anything to add reblog this. There’s also this list here which has a few bisexual books that I’ve missed off and a post here with a few more. If any followers notice any thing wrong (for example if I’ve sad a character is bisexual but actually they’re gay) let me know, I tried to include a lot of stuff in this post so I might have missed something or misread something.

-Lauren

Fabulous list! One of the first times I’ve seen the Wicked Lovely series recced which just makes me incredibly happy. 

Would like to add: 

(all my links are to Book Depository) 

Pantomime by Laura Lam which is a fantasy/steampunk and has an intersex, gender-variant, polysexual main character, and several other queer characters. I loved this one, and it has my full recommendation. 

Guardian of the Dead by Karen Healey has a sort of major asexual guy, but there are no other queer characters. Was not my favorite book, but the ace representation was good. 

The Summer Prince by Alaya Dawn Johnson is a dystopia where all the characters are considered polysexual, and polyamory is one of the norms. Took me awhile to get through it, but was very well-written, and is definitely my favorite dystopian novel. 

There’s also Quicksilver by R.J. Johnson. This is a sequel to Ultraviolet, and has a main character who is asexual. I’m not sure where exactly it falls genre-wise, but there are apparently sci-fi elements. This is a really great review by asexualagenda over on wordpress. 

Oh, and Otherbound by Corinne Duyvis! I haven’t read it yet, but have heard many people talk about how good it is. It’s a sci-fi book with lots of queer characters, and lots of other representation. 

And also, Love in the Time of Global Warming has a trans character (As well as lots of other queerness)! He is part of one of my literary OTPs. 

-V 

Awesome and super useful lists. 

Filed under quiltbag LGBT* etc readers advisory ra books to read

26,398 notes

fishingboatproceeds:

Mario Balotelli is an Italian footballer who may soon become a Liverpool player. He has long been one of my favorite players, and I can’t help but think that the way his reputation in Europe is shaped by race. (Balotelli has been the victim of horrific racist chants throughout his career, but I also think institutional racism shapes media coverage and popular opinion, as pointed out here and elsewhere.)
Balotelli is certainly an unusual footballer: Once, while signing an autograph for a child, Balotelli learned the kid was being bullied, and then drove across town to confront the bully and discuss the matter with the school principal. And he is famed for his generosity, although this is often portrayed popularly as an inability to handle his money well.
He also has a reputation for volatility and immaturity, and is often criticized for getting in fights with teammates. He once threw a dart at a younger player. You hear a lot that Balotelli is crazy and/or lazy. You hear that he stays out late.
Now, I think some of Balotelli’s professional behavior has been poor, and I’m not here to defend it. But look at the way we treat white players:
Liverpool’s Robbie Fowler once PRETENDED TO SNORT THE WHITE POWDER OF THE TOUCH LINE after scoring a goal, in reference to his cocaine use.
Craig Bellamy drunkenly beat a teammate with a golf club. 
Peter Beagrie once drunkenly stole someone’s motorbike and drove it through a hotel’s plate glass window. 
Point being, in all the cases above (and many, many, many more) the offenses were seen as youthful indiscretions, or as hilarious examples of Boys being Boys.
Fowler is now a coach; Beagrie is now a well-respected commentator; and Bellamy is still playing. You rarely hear about his on- and off-field indiscretions, even though they’re probably more numerous than Balotelli’s. Meanwhile, Balotelli makes the news (and gets fined $200,000) for eating curry.
Those of you who follow football will begin to hear a lot about Balotelli if he returns to play in England. You will hear about how he cried after being substituted (although you might not hear that he cried because he had to sit on the bench while racist chants rang through the stadium). You will hear about how he is “wild” and “unpredictable” and “lazy.” 
But watch him play. Watch how good and smart and creative he can be, how he can find paths to goal that make people call him lazy (they called Messi lazy, too, remember) when really he is just waiting, like the chess master who sees four moves ahead. Watch him off the ball, moving to reshape the opposition’s defense.
And then watch him score, turn around unsmiling, and lift his shirt to ask the immense and complicated question.

Interesting perspective. I’m curious to see what happen with Balotelli.

fishingboatproceeds:

Mario Balotelli is an Italian footballer who may soon become a Liverpool player. He has long been one of my favorite players, and I can’t help but think that the way his reputation in Europe is shaped by race. (Balotelli has been the victim of horrific racist chants throughout his career, but I also think institutional racism shapes media coverage and popular opinion, as pointed out here and elsewhere.)

Balotelli is certainly an unusual footballer: Once, while signing an autograph for a child, Balotelli learned the kid was being bullied, and then drove across town to confront the bully and discuss the matter with the school principal. And he is famed for his generosity, although this is often portrayed popularly as an inability to handle his money well.

He also has a reputation for volatility and immaturity, and is often criticized for getting in fights with teammates. He once threw a dart at a younger player. You hear a lot that Balotelli is crazy and/or lazy. You hear that he stays out late.

Now, I think some of Balotelli’s professional behavior has been poor, and I’m not here to defend it. But look at the way we treat white players:

Liverpool’s Robbie Fowler once PRETENDED TO SNORT THE WHITE POWDER OF THE TOUCH LINE after scoring a goal, in reference to his cocaine use.

Craig Bellamy drunkenly beat a teammate with a golf club

Peter Beagrie once drunkenly stole someone’s motorbike and drove it through a hotel’s plate glass window

Point being, in all the cases above (and many, many, many more) the offenses were seen as youthful indiscretions, or as hilarious examples of Boys being Boys.

Fowler is now a coach; Beagrie is now a well-respected commentator; and Bellamy is still playing. You rarely hear about his on- and off-field indiscretions, even though they’re probably more numerous than Balotelli’s. Meanwhile, Balotelli makes the news (and gets fined $200,000) for eating curry.

Those of you who follow football will begin to hear a lot about Balotelli if he returns to play in England. You will hear about how he cried after being substituted (although you might not hear that he cried because he had to sit on the bench while racist chants rang through the stadium). You will hear about how he is “wild” and “unpredictable” and “lazy.” 

But watch him play. Watch how good and smart and creative he can be, how he can find paths to goal that make people call him lazy (they called Messi lazy, too, remember) when really he is just waiting, like the chess master who sees four moves ahead. Watch him off the ball, moving to reshape the opposition’s defense.

And then watch him score, turn around unsmiling, and lift his shirt to ask the immense and complicated question.

Interesting perspective. I’m curious to see what happen with Balotelli.

Filed under liverpool ac milan epl balotelli football