domestic8

the vagaries of domestic life

359 notes

micdotcom:

Next time you get catcalled, just give them one of these

What do you do when a random stranger on the street tells you to smile, comments on your legs, hair or ass and then disappears with a smirk? Do you smile back to make him go away? Do you walk in the opposite direction? Do you give him a piece of your mind? 
Enter Lindsey, 28, a woman from Minneapolis who knows the feeling all too well. After a particularly frustrating interaction last year, Lindsey took to Craigslist to voice her disgust.
Genius plan she came up with | Follow micdotcom 


For sure making some of these for my next ALA trip.

micdotcom:

Next time you get catcalled, just give them one of these

What do you do when a random stranger on the street tells you to smile, comments on your legs, hair or ass and then disappears with a smirk? Do you smile back to make him go away? Do you walk in the opposite direction? Do you give him a piece of your mind? 

Enter Lindsey, 28, a woman from Minneapolis who knows the feeling all too well. After a particularly frustrating interaction last year, Lindsey took to Craigslist to voice her disgust.

Genius plan she came up with | Follow micdotcom 

For sure making some of these for my next ALA trip.

(via tehlibrarylife)

Filed under ala cards against harassment

2,476 notes

geekymerch:

"Book Nerd" Tea Light Sample Pack from Frostbeard Studio.

The “Book Nerd” Sample Pack offers six different tea light testers of our Book Lovers’ Candles. These candles are completely original scents inspired by the smell of nerdy books, their settings and characters. 

Scents Included:

  • Shire - Oakmoss, clover, aloe, and a hint of pipe tobacco. Refreshing and earthy.
  • Don’t Panic (Fresh Towel) - Fresh linen and green tea. Soothing and refreshing.
  • Winterfell - Pine tree and firewood. The perfect cozy, Winter fragrance.
  • Mockingjay - Scotch pine and cinnamon. Warm and woodsy.
  • Cliffs of Insanity - Sea mist fragrance oil and Caribbean teakwood.
  • Sassenach - Lavender, thyme and basil. Refreshing herbal mix.

Buy yours here!

It seems like adding a bookish descriptor will convince me to purchase anything …

(via librarianbyday)

Filed under books etsy candles

32 notes

transformativetidbits:

get-educated:

3 Common Myths About Teaching

My sister spent her first year of teaching working a minimum of 60 hours per week, on a salary of $32,000. She’s got five years under her belt now, but makes little more than that and also now works more like 45-50 hours per week, but only because she stopped coaching cheerleading in order to have more time to prepare lessons for her AP History students. My mom has 30 years of experience working in urban education, with 12 of those years at a school with 98% subsidized lunch (a common marker of neighborhood poverty in school zones) and she also worked a second job checking groceries at night so I could go to college. My dad is also a public school teacher and neither of them saw anything resembling a “summer off” until the last four-five years (my sister and I are grown and long out of the house). He taught summer school for as many years as I can remember, and also fast-track classes at night at our local community college. He and my mother both worked on finishing their master’s degrees, leap-frog style, at local universities throughout my childhood, in hopes of increasing their salaries enough to cover the mortgage. They are all three excellent teachers and deeply care for their students’ well-being and educational experience. They are all also exhausted and frequently called “lazy,” “greedy,” and all sorts of other names, simply for joining the union and advocating for better pay and smaller class sizes, so they can do their damn jobs. 
Next time you think about making a joke about how you wish you could have “three months off every summer,” or about how collective bargaining by public employees is completely unnecessary, or anything to the effect of “those who can’t, teach,” just don’t.
/end education rant

Reposted on behalf of my father, sister, aunts and uncles and cousins on both sides of my family, and my grandmother. 

transformativetidbits:

get-educated:

3 Common Myths About Teaching

My sister spent her first year of teaching working a minimum of 60 hours per week, on a salary of $32,000. She’s got five years under her belt now, but makes little more than that and also now works more like 45-50 hours per week, but only because she stopped coaching cheerleading in order to have more time to prepare lessons for her AP History students. My mom has 30 years of experience working in urban education, with 12 of those years at a school with 98% subsidized lunch (a common marker of neighborhood poverty in school zones) and she also worked a second job checking groceries at night so I could go to college. My dad is also a public school teacher and neither of them saw anything resembling a “summer off” until the last four-five years (my sister and I are grown and long out of the house). He taught summer school for as many years as I can remember, and also fast-track classes at night at our local community college. He and my mother both worked on finishing their master’s degrees, leap-frog style, at local universities throughout my childhood, in hopes of increasing their salaries enough to cover the mortgage. They are all three excellent teachers and deeply care for their students’ well-being and educational experience. They are all also exhausted and frequently called “lazy,” “greedy,” and all sorts of other names, simply for joining the union and advocating for better pay and smaller class sizes, so they can do their damn jobs

Next time you think about making a joke about how you wish you could have “three months off every summer,” or about how collective bargaining by public employees is completely unnecessary, or anything to the effect of “those who can’t, teach,” just don’t.

/end education rant

Reposted on behalf of my father, sister, aunts and uncles and cousins on both sides of my family, and my grandmother. 

Filed under teaching public schools public service