domestic8

the vagaries of domestic life

1 note

public-radio-market:

The Numbers Game: Baseball’s Lifelong Fascination with Statistics by Alan Schwarz
  Buy Book | Kindle
All Things Considered: Alan Schwarz: Shawn Green, Yom Kippur and Baseball
All Things Considered: Look Out, 1962 Mets — Here Come the Royals
Talk of the Nation: The Next Big Thing: Baseball in 2008
Talk of the Nation: Strasburg To Pitch First Major League Game
Talk of the Nation: Ripken Enters MLB Hall of Fame, McGwire Snubbed
If you frequent Beyond the Box Score, it’s likely that you enjoy using statistical and objective analysis to evaluate baseball. When and how did the game become so driven by data and numbers? Many would say that it’s only happened recently, but the truth is baseball has been tracking statistics since its invention in the 19th century, and in The Numbers Game, Alan Schwartz traces the history of those very figures. He starts with Henry Chadwick, the creator of the very first box score, and he runs through innovators all the way to John Dewan, who has built STATS Inc. and Baseball Info Solutions. A fun unconventional story, The Numbers Game was named ESPN’s 2004 Baseball Book of the Year.

Scorekeeping: the best.
Beyond the Box Score: if you like baseball, definitely follow!

public-radio-market:

The Numbers Game: Baseball’s Lifelong Fascination with Statistics by Alan Schwarz

Buy  Buy Book | Kindle

All Things Considered: Alan Schwarz: Shawn Green, Yom Kippur and Baseball

All Things Considered: Look Out, 1962 Mets — Here Come the Royals

Talk of the Nation: The Next Big Thing: Baseball in 2008

Talk of the Nation: Strasburg To Pitch First Major League Game

Talk of the Nation: Ripken Enters MLB Hall of Fame, McGwire Snubbed

If you frequent Beyond the Box Score, it’s likely that you enjoy using statistical and objective analysis to evaluate baseball. When and how did the game become so driven by data and numbers? Many would say that it’s only happened recently, but the truth is baseball has been tracking statistics since its invention in the 19th century, and in The Numbers Game, Alan Schwartz traces the history of those very figures. He starts with Henry Chadwick, the creator of the very first box score, and he runs through innovators all the way to John Dewan, who has built STATS Inc. and Baseball Info Solutions. A fun unconventional story, The Numbers Game was named ESPN’s 2004 Baseball Book of the Year.

Scorekeeping: the best.

Beyond the Box Score: if you like baseball, definitely follow!

Filed under baseball books scorekeeping stats even for not-math-persons

26 notes

thepinakes:

thepinakes:

Is this a conversation you’d like to see at the ALA Annual Conference 2014? We’ve pitched this idea for an ALA Conversation Starter, but now it’s up to a public vote. Anyone with an ALA Connect account can vote, whether or not they think they’ll attend the conference.
What I Really Want to do is Direct: First-time Directors Discuss Their Experiences

You know that cliché about actors really wanting to direct? It turns out that it’s also true of new (or not so new) librarians. In this panel, four first-time library directors will discuss how they arrived in their positions, the skills that helped them move into leadership, and the obstacles they didn’t anticipate.
This panel discussion is intended for those who are interested in moving into management positions, as well as new library administrators facing similar issues. Panelists include academic library directors Jacob Berg and Jessica Olin, and public library administrators Kristi Chadwick and John Pappas. Daniel Ransom will moderate.

While you’re on ALA Connect, there are many other Conversation Starters and Ignite Sessions worth your vote, so spread the love around.
Original photo: University of Washington’s Suzallo Library shot by Michael Riffle and made available via Creative Commons license. Title fonts and color inspired by Wes Anderson. Obviously.

We’re down to the last few days of voting on the ALA Conversation Starters! Please vote for #iwannadirect!

Nice!

thepinakes:

thepinakes:

Is this a conversation you’d like to see at the ALA Annual Conference 2014? We’ve pitched this idea for an ALA Conversation Starter, but now it’s up to a public vote. Anyone with an ALA Connect account can vote, whether or not they think they’ll attend the conference.

What I Really Want to do is Direct: First-time Directors Discuss Their Experiences

You know that cliché about actors really wanting to direct? It turns out that it’s also true of new (or not so new) librarians. In this panel, four first-time library directors will discuss how they arrived in their positions, the skills that helped them move into leadership, and the obstacles they didn’t anticipate.

This panel discussion is intended for those who are interested in moving into management positions, as well as new library administrators facing similar issues. Panelists include academic library directors Jacob Berg and Jessica Olin, and public library administrators Kristi Chadwick and John Pappas. Daniel Ransom will moderate.

While you’re on ALA Connect, there are many other Conversation Starters and Ignite Sessions worth your vote, so spread the love around.

Original photo: University of Washington’s Suzallo Library shot by Michael Riffle and made available via Creative Commons license. Title fonts and color inspired by Wes Anderson. Obviously.

We’re down to the last few days of voting on the ALA Conversation Starters! Please vote for #iwannadirect!

Nice!

Filed under ala libraries ala14

1 note

public-radio-market:

Up, Up, and Away: The Kid, the Hawk, Rock, Vladi, Pedro, le Grand Orange, Youppi!, the Crazy Business of Baseball, and the Ill-fated but Unforgettable Montreal Expos by Jonah Keri
  Buy Book | Kindle
The definitive history of the Montreal Expos by the definitive Expos fan, the New York Times bestselling sportswriter and Grantland columnist Jonah Keri. 
2014 is the 20th anniversary of the strike that killed baseball in Montreal, and the 10th anniversary of the team’s move to Washington, DC. But the memories aren’t dead—not by a long shot. The Expos pinwheel cap is still sported by Montrealers, former fans, and by many more in the US and Canada as a fashion item. Expos loyalists are still spotted at Blue Jays games and wherever the Washington Nationals play (often cheering against them). Every year there are rumours that Montreal—as North America’s largest market without a baseball team—could host Major League Baseball again.
There has never been a major English-language book on the entire franchise history. There also hasn’t been a sportswriter as uniquely qualified to tell the whole story, and to make it appeal to baseball fans across Canada AND south of the border. Jonah Keri writes the chief baseball column for Grantland, and routinely makes appearances in Canadian media such as The Jeff Blair Show, Prime Time Sports and Off the Record. The author of the New York Times baseball bestseller The Extra 2% (Ballantine/ESPN Books), Keri is one of the new generation of high-profile sports writers equally facile with sabermetrics and traditional baseball reporting. He has interviewed everyone for this book (EVERYONE: including the ownership that allowed the team to be moved), and fans can expect to hear from just about every player and personality from the Expos’ unforgettable 35 years in baseball. Up, Up, and Away is already one of the most anticipated sports books of next year.

I kind of want to read this, but then I think about Dawson being in the hall in a not-Cubs hat, and then I tear up a little.

public-radio-market:

Up, Up, and Away: The Kid, the Hawk, Rock, Vladi, Pedro, le Grand Orange, Youppi!, the Crazy Business of Baseball, and the Ill-fated but Unforgettable Montreal Expos by Jonah Keri

Buy  Buy Book | Kindle

The definitive history of the Montreal Expos by the definitive Expos fan, the New York Times bestselling sportswriter and Grantland columnist Jonah Keri. 

2014 is the 20th anniversary of the strike that killed baseball in Montreal, and the 10th anniversary of the team’s move to Washington, DC. But the memories aren’t dead—not by a long shot. The Expos pinwheel cap is still sported by Montrealers, former fans, and by many more in the US and Canada as a fashion item. Expos loyalists are still spotted at Blue Jays games and wherever the Washington Nationals play (often cheering against them). Every year there are rumours that Montreal—as North America’s largest market without a baseball team—could host Major League Baseball again.

There has never been a major English-language book on the entire franchise history. There also hasn’t been a sportswriter as uniquely qualified to tell the whole story, and to make it appeal to baseball fans across Canada AND south of the border. Jonah Keri writes the chief baseball column for Grantland, and routinely makes appearances in Canadian media such as The Jeff Blair Show, Prime Time Sports and Off the Record. The author of the New York Times baseball bestseller The Extra 2% (Ballantine/ESPN Books), Keri is one of the new generation of high-profile sports writers equally facile with sabermetrics and traditional baseball reporting. He has interviewed everyone for this book (EVERYONE: including the ownership that allowed the team to be moved), and fans can expect to hear from just about every player and personality from the Expos’ unforgettable 35 years in baseball. Up, Up, and Away is already one of the most anticipated sports books of next year.

I kind of want to read this, but then I think about Dawson being in the hall in a not-Cubs hat, and then I tear up a little.

Filed under baseball the hawk andre dawson chicago cubs cooperstown montreal expos

60 notes

How US libraries are becoming community problem solvers

(Source: ala-con)

Filed under libraries community awesome